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February 25, 2012
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Just a quickie today because I saw something that made me smile!

I love it when artists post the lineart and then the finished piece.  In the case of this drawing, the lines are charming and well-executed, but don't particularly give the impression of a finished piece.  They are clearly one part of a considered process.

Overstreet Catwoman Lineart by AdamHughes  Overstreet Catwoman by AdamHughes

A lot of the time, lines are used as a description of exclusively form and the things that can be conveyed that way, composition, expression, etc.  Then, when we color, we begin to consider things like mood and lighting.  I've been thinking a lot about how to describe light with line while working on the recent ink drawings, and so I had a particular "squee" moment when I noticed this lovely spot of consideration in Hughes' drawing-

Look at the color version at the shadow behind Selina- the shape of it, and compare it to the line version.  Despite there being very little detail in the wall behind her, he took care to put a greater line weight and detail in between the rocks where they would be in shadow.  Also the tread of her boot makes me happy in the same way- he knew it would be snow crusted and so didn't waste brushstrokes describing the unnecessary silhouette of the boot.

So cool.  Yeah, planning!
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:icontrdlcomics:
TRDLcomics Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
When I ink my own work, I ink everything in a lighter line weight, and then lay down thicker primary contours as I need them later. It's a layering process. I've noticed better results when i DONT do that: ink the secondary and tertiary contours distinctly, then ink the primary contour with the larger lineweight alone. But it's something I'm comfortable doing the former way...
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:icontrdlcomics:
TRDLcomics Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
great eye for the details there...
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:iconelmenora:
elmenora Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2012  Student General Artist
Ahhh, that is some masterful inking! Thank you for finding and sharing :)
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:iconninkira:
ninkira Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012  Student General Artist
Wow great observation. Thanks for reawakening my love for Adam Hughes' art XD
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:iconstr4yk1tt3n:
str4yk1tt3n Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012
That is awesome.
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:iconsilverlute:
Silverlute Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012   Digital Artist
For me it's unusual there isn't much of a subtle shading and, yet, his works still look beautiful.
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:iconorangepopfox:
OrangePopFox Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012
man I love Hughes, He'd got such a great combination of soft lighting and skin tone and stark, bold lines, I love his stuff.
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:iconsilvertide:
Silvertide Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012
Thanks for sharing!

So many small details to consider. :>

I found it interesting how many of the lines are not perfectly straight, yet still look right to me...
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:icongreensprite:
GreenSprite Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Nice find. One thing that I just don't get in his colouring is why does he not use any black at all on her face? It looks so washed out against the awesome black suit. I guess no black should be realistic, but to me the effect is that it flattens her face, oddly.

I'm sure it makes sense somehow, I just don't see it.
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:iconmarmotic:
Marmotic Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012
I can see what you are describing as the flatness of the face and i guess that the artist may have deliberately kept from adding black/or darker tones from the face simply to keep it, and the overall image as information, more intelligible?

Strangely, the flattening effect that you mention reminds me somehow of Gustav Klimt's work (i'm thinking particularly of 'Judith')where you also might find these strange relationships between overall pattern/background and portrait.
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:icontoerning:
toerning Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012
YES. There is a graphic-ness to the approach which actually makes me think of Mucha!
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:iconmarmotic:
Marmotic Featured By Owner Feb 29, 2012
Yes,the overall look of the piece, especially the linework,do share qualities with Mucha's illustration work.
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:icontoerning:
toerning Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012
You know, I was thinking about that too, it was one of the first things I noticed about the color drawing and initially I also kinda disliked it. But I think it's a graphic choice, if not a "realistic" one. The face already pulls so much attention because of placement, rendering, and our natural tendency to look at a face in any composition, that if it were to have full blacks, the contrast might be too high and it would pull attention away from the rest of the picture. As it is, it sits back a little bit and allows you to really enjoy the rest of the story.
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:icongreensprite:
GreenSprite Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Hmm. I thought about it and... I think it's actually a sort of tongue-in-cheek thing. The situation is so stereotypically cartoony, and so is the lineart. But the face is very realistic *and* stylistically distinct from the rest. It's like he has a sexy actress play an intentionally cheesy role. So, pin-up reference pretty much (with a touch of "I don't take this comics thing THAT seriously"? ;)).

Yeah, totally reading too much into it. But it's fun :D
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:icontoerning:
toerning Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012
I love that idea, I think you're spot on! :heart:
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:iconpeppermint-pinwheel:
Peppermint-Pinwheel Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Oh wow!! I never noticed those details *____* I need to learn how to be more observant. Great read!
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:icontoerning:
toerning Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012
Well we learn BY observing. Next time you see a similar lighting scenario you will surely notice something else because you'll be looking! :heart: thanks for reading!
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:iconpeppermint-pinwheel:
Peppermint-Pinwheel Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Very true! Immediately after I read your journal I went off to look through Adams art book. So many things I never noticed! I hope you continue to post your thoughts and tips. They are wonderful reads :D I love learning so much :excited: (sorry for the spazz, this sort of thing really excites me ^^;)
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:iconasatira:
Asatira Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
That is interesting to point out. I have seen both versions of this piece, and like them, but I did not notice details like that. It does go to show what things artists will consider when they know how the piece will be finished. I would not, at this point in my art life, have done those details because it wouldn't occur to me to do so.
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:icontoerning:
toerning Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012
But I bet next time you draw a spotlight, you'll remember, eh? That's how these things go! Thanks for reading! :heart:
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:iconpsshaw:
Psshaw Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
AHHH. I said "holy crap" out loud when I noticed it. Very inspiring, thank you for getting excited about this stuff.
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:icontoerning:
toerning Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2012
Thank YOU for getting excited about this stuff! I consider myself lucky to have people with whom I can geek out about it haha
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